Taxonomy

Animalia

Mollusca

Cephalopoda O. Octopodoidea

A cephalopod is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda (Greek plural κεφαλόποδες, kephalópodes; "head-feet") such as a squid, octopus, cuttlefish, or nautilus. These exclusively marine animals are characterized by bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles (muscular hydrostats) modified from the primitive molluscan foot. Fishermen sometimes call cephalopods "inkfish," referring to their common ability to squirt ink. The study of cephalopods is a branch of malacology known as teuthology.

Cephalopoda. Retrieved May, 08 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cephalopod.


Octopus (pl. octopuses, see below for variants) relates to approximately 300 species of soft-bodied, eight-limbed molluscs of the order Octopoda (ok-TO-pə-də). The order is grouped within the class Cephalopoda with squids, cuttlefish, and nautiloids. Like other cephalopods, an octopus is bilaterally symmetric with two eyes and a beak, with its mouth at the center point of the eight limbs. The soft body can rapidly alter its shape, enabling octopuses to squeeze through small gaps. They trail their eight appendages behind them as they swim. The siphon is used both for respiration and for locomotion, by expelling a jet of water. Octopuses have a complex nervous system and excellent sight, and are among the most intelligent and behaviourally diverse of all invertebrates.

Octopoda. Retrieved May, 08 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus.


Octopodoidea is a superfamily of the suborder Incirrata containing all octopods except for the argonauts (Alloposidae, Argonautidae, Ocythoidae and Tremoctopodidae) and the vampire squid.

Octopodoidea. Retrieved May, 08 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopodoidea.